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Best match
Bhutan turns an environmental challenge into employment opportunity for a young population desperate for re-entering the job market. An eco-friendly initiative offers training and employment to young people in drug rehabilitation centers and contributes to reducing the environmental impact of 100 tonnes of paper waste a year. The solution promotes the use of locally produced egg trays from recycled materials to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and reliance on imported carbon intense trays transported from other countries. It also contributes to the economic and social reintegration of the youth. Neighboring countries are looking how they can replicate and scale up the success of Bhutan’s initiative.
Youth in Bhutan: From Waste to Employment

Bhutan turns an environmental challenge into employment opportunity for a young population desperate for re-entering the job market. An eco-friendly initiative offers training and employment to young people in drug rehabilitation centers and contributes to reducing the environmental impact of 100 tonnes of paper waste a year. The solution promotes the use of locally produced egg trays from recycled materials to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and reliance on imported carbon intense trays transported from other countries. It also contributes to the economic and social reintegration of the youth. Neighboring countries are looking how they can replicate and scale up the success of Bhutan’s initiative.

Best match
The Ruaha Carnivore Project is a grassroots carnivore conservation organization, focusing on identifying cultural and/or economic drivers of traditional wildlife killing, and aiming to replace them through conservation in Tanzania. One key aspect of the project is training and employing villagers to monitor and conserve wildlife through community camera-trapping.<br />
Engaging pastoralists to preserve wildlife conservation in Tanzania

The Ruaha Carnivore Project is a grassroots carnivore conservation organization, focusing on identifying cultural and/or economic drivers of traditional wildlife killing, and aiming to replace them through conservation in Tanzania. One key aspect of the project is training and employing villagers to monitor and conserve wildlife through community camera-trapping.<br />

Best match
The Whales of Guerrero Research Project is a successful and replicable project that collaborates with local communities to promote marine conservation through research, educational outreach and capacity-building activities.
Collaborating with local communities to promote marine conservation in Mexico

The Whales of Guerrero Research Project is a successful and replicable project that collaborates with local communities to promote marine conservation through research, educational outreach and capacity-building activities.

Best match
To address the root causes of vulnerability and to increase the productivity and market access of smallholder farmers, the Government of Zimbabwe requested China’s support. China’s experience on empowering small-holder farmers, post-harvest loss management and rural transformation are highly relevant for Zimbabwe. <br />
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Zimbabwe will be the first pilot country of the UN World Food Programme (WFP) China Centre of Excellence’s programme called “Demonstration in Africa by Africans”, which aims at extending China’s affordable and applicable agricultural technologies to aspirational lead smallholder farmers in Africa.<br />
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The “Demonstration in Africa by Africans” programme will focus on (1) developing local agricultural value chains; (2) applying emerging information technology; (3) sharing modern management techniques for agricultural business and markets, and (4) setting up short-cycled, effective and efficient agriculture businesses for smallholders based on local resources. <br />
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The “Demonstration in Africa by Africans” programme fosters the cross-country transfer of technological solutions and best practices for smallholder farmers through on-site trainings and experts deployment. <br />
<br />
In the specific case of Zimbabwe, smallholder farmers receive on-site training in China and Chinese experts will then be deployed to Zimbabwe to support the practical application of China’s solutions on the ground.<br />
<br />
For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page.<br />
<br />
China and Zimbabwe Partnership on Demonstration in Africa by Africans

To address the root causes of vulnerability and to increase the productivity and market access of smallholder farmers, the Government of Zimbabwe requested China’s support. China’s experience on empowering small-holder farmers, post-harvest loss management and rural transformation are highly relevant for Zimbabwe. <br />
<br />
Zimbabwe will be the first pilot country of the UN World Food Programme (WFP) China Centre of Excellence’s programme called “Demonstration in Africa by Africans”, which aims at extending China’s affordable and applicable agricultural technologies to aspirational lead smallholder farmers in Africa.<br />
<br />
The “Demonstration in Africa by Africans” programme will focus on (1) developing local agricultural value chains; (2) applying emerging information technology; (3) sharing modern management techniques for agricultural business and markets, and (4) setting up short-cycled, effective and efficient agriculture businesses for smallholders based on local resources. <br />
<br />
The “Demonstration in Africa by Africans” programme fosters the cross-country transfer of technological solutions and best practices for smallholder farmers through on-site trainings and experts deployment. <br />
<br />
In the specific case of Zimbabwe, smallholder farmers receive on-site training in China and Chinese experts will then be deployed to Zimbabwe to support the practical application of China’s solutions on the ground.<br />
<br />
For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page.<br />
<br />

Best match
In 2014 the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) launched a programme in Uganda combining training & airtight storage to tackle high-levels of post-harvest loss caused by pests, diseases, poor handling, and ineffective storage. The major stakeholder of the initiative are small-scale farmers in all regions of Uganda, the private sector manufacturers and distributors of airtight storage, and increasingly, the Government of Uganda. <br />
<br />
As a result, post-harvest loss was reduced from 40% to less than 2% among participating farmers. By the end of 2016, over 115,000 households chose to participate in training, then purchase airtight storage. <br />
<br />
This effective, scalable, and replicable model continues to create demand from other frontier markets. In response, WFP has set up its Global Post Harvest Knowledge & Operations Centre (KNOC) in Uganda to facilitate South-South knowledge sharing and exchange. The Centre has already welcomed delegations from 18 countries for field visits that include meetings with participating farmers, sessions with Ugandan officials, training-of-trainers sessions, and knowledge sharing with hermetic silo manufacturers. Its activities are conducive to the South-South efforts of Uganda’s private sector to transfer innovative technology on silo management to other countries in the region (e.g. Zambia, Tanzania). Delegations include government officials, WFP implementing staff, and at times, metal artisans who bring back skills to their own countries. The next major convening in Kampala will be held in Q4 2017.<br />
<br />
Innovation:<br />
This is a very innovative initiative due to the combination of several success factors:<br />
<br />
• Value chain approach: eliminating post-harvest losses is not a technical problem – it is a supply chain challenge, and cannot be effectively addressed in isolation. <br />
<br />
• Focus on scaling of proven technologies: good answers to one of the biggest food security challenges already exist – but have not been scaled. Private sector involvement at earliest stage, with clear profit incentives has been a key success driver.<br />
<br />
• Partnership and collaboration with government, NGOs, UN agencies and the private sector. <br />
<br />
• Capacity development of farmers: through one-day training workshops. <br />
<br />
For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page. <br />
Tackling Post Harvest Losses in Uganda through the WFP Zero Food Loss Initiative

In 2014 the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) launched a programme in Uganda combining training & airtight storage to tackle high-levels of post-harvest loss caused by pests, diseases, poor handling, and ineffective storage. The major stakeholder of the initiative are small-scale farmers in all regions of Uganda, the private sector manufacturers and distributors of airtight storage, and increasingly, the Government of Uganda. <br />
<br />
As a result, post-harvest loss was reduced from 40% to less than 2% among participating farmers. By the end of 2016, over 115,000 households chose to participate in training, then purchase airtight storage. <br />
<br />
This effective, scalable, and replicable model continues to create demand from other frontier markets. In response, WFP has set up its Global Post Harvest Knowledge & Operations Centre (KNOC) in Uganda to facilitate South-South knowledge sharing and exchange. The Centre has already welcomed delegations from 18 countries for field visits that include meetings with participating farmers, sessions with Ugandan officials, training-of-trainers sessions, and knowledge sharing with hermetic silo manufacturers. Its activities are conducive to the South-South efforts of Uganda’s private sector to transfer innovative technology on silo management to other countries in the region (e.g. Zambia, Tanzania). Delegations include government officials, WFP implementing staff, and at times, metal artisans who bring back skills to their own countries. The next major convening in Kampala will be held in Q4 2017.<br />
<br />
Innovation:<br />
This is a very innovative initiative due to the combination of several success factors:<br />
<br />
• Value chain approach: eliminating post-harvest losses is not a technical problem – it is a supply chain challenge, and cannot be effectively addressed in isolation. <br />
<br />
• Focus on scaling of proven technologies: good answers to one of the biggest food security challenges already exist – but have not been scaled. Private sector involvement at earliest stage, with clear profit incentives has been a key success driver.<br />
<br />
• Partnership and collaboration with government, NGOs, UN agencies and the private sector. <br />
<br />
• Capacity development of farmers: through one-day training workshops. <br />
<br />
For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page. <br />

Best match
Social protection and safety nets is WFP’s largest focus area for South-South and triangular exchanges worldwide. <br />
<br />
The Dominican Republic’s Progresando con Solidaridad programme represents an excellent and innovative example of how to optimize an existing national social protection scheme and make it highly nutrition-sensitive.<br />
<br />
While a number of social protection schemes around the world may have a single nutrition component, Progresando con Solidaridad is innovative for the comprehensive range of nutrition components that are embedded in the programme. For example, the programme includes nutrition education; community nutrition networks and distribution of micronutrient powders and specialized nutritious food to children under the age of 5, to pregnant and lactating women and to the elderly.<br />
<br />
Its nutrition intervention component was first targeted to all children aged 6-59 months of beneficiary families, who were identified as living in moderate and extreme poverty. After 2013, the nutrition intervention was extended to children under the age of five, pregnant and lactating women and the elderly benefitting from the programme. <br />
<br />
An evaluation of the nutrition component of the Progresando con Solidaridad programme (2013), highlighted a 50 percent reduction in anaemia prevalence in children enrolled in the programme. Progresando con Solidaridad programme was selected as a successful case study at the Global Forum on Nutrition-Sensitive Social Protection in September 2015. The Forum is a South-South learning platform facilitated by the WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil, which promotes South-South and triangular cooperation and aims to facilitate exchanges of lessons learned on social protection programmes across the developing world. Over 150 participants from 20 countries joined the Forum and learnt from the Dominican Republic’s experience.<br />
<br />
For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page. <br />
Leveraging Social Protection platforms for improved nutrition in the Dominican Republic

Social protection and safety nets is WFP’s largest focus area for South-South and triangular exchanges worldwide. <br />
<br />
The Dominican Republic’s Progresando con Solidaridad programme represents an excellent and innovative example of how to optimize an existing national social protection scheme and make it highly nutrition-sensitive.<br />
<br />
While a number of social protection schemes around the world may have a single nutrition component, Progresando con Solidaridad is innovative for the comprehensive range of nutrition components that are embedded in the programme. For example, the programme includes nutrition education; community nutrition networks and distribution of micronutrient powders and specialized nutritious food to children under the age of 5, to pregnant and lactating women and to the elderly.<br />
<br />
Its nutrition intervention component was first targeted to all children aged 6-59 months of beneficiary families, who were identified as living in moderate and extreme poverty. After 2013, the nutrition intervention was extended to children under the age of five, pregnant and lactating women and the elderly benefitting from the programme. <br />
<br />
An evaluation of the nutrition component of the Progresando con Solidaridad programme (2013), highlighted a 50 percent reduction in anaemia prevalence in children enrolled in the programme. Progresando con Solidaridad programme was selected as a successful case study at the Global Forum on Nutrition-Sensitive Social Protection in September 2015. The Forum is a South-South learning platform facilitated by the WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil, which promotes South-South and triangular cooperation and aims to facilitate exchanges of lessons learned on social protection programmes across the developing world. Over 150 participants from 20 countries joined the Forum and learnt from the Dominican Republic’s experience.<br />
<br />
For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page. <br />

Best match
When Category 5 tropical cyclone Winston struck Fiji in February 2016, almost 62 percent of the population was affected with losses estimated around 31 percent of national GDP. <br />
<br />
The geographic location and structure of the Fiji islands and other South Pacific countries makes emergency response more complicated than in other isolated countries. Traditional logistics-based humanitarian responses with in-kind support to affected people, are not always the most effective solutions. Linking national social protection systems with emergency humanitarian assistance and using different transfer modalities, including cash and voucher, can be an effective way to ensure relief to families in need. <br />
<br />
The Fiji Government’s response to tropical cyclone Winston helped to bridge the historical divide between externally-led emergency responses and nationally-led long-term development programmes. <br />
<br />
Fiji’s lessons learned on emergency response serves as an inspiration for other countries in the region and will be shared with the wider Pacific community, through a Pacific Regional Social Protection and Emergency Response Workshop. WFP has expressed willingness to facilitate such an initiative, also in view of supporting Fiji and other governments in the Pacific community through South-South learning on emergency preparedness and response. <br />
<br />
For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page. <br />
Fiji Emergency Response to Tropical Cyclone Winston

When Category 5 tropical cyclone Winston struck Fiji in February 2016, almost 62 percent of the population was affected with losses estimated around 31 percent of national GDP. <br />
<br />
The geographic location and structure of the Fiji islands and other South Pacific countries makes emergency response more complicated than in other isolated countries. Traditional logistics-based humanitarian responses with in-kind support to affected people, are not always the most effective solutions. Linking national social protection systems with emergency humanitarian assistance and using different transfer modalities, including cash and voucher, can be an effective way to ensure relief to families in need. <br />
<br />
The Fiji Government’s response to tropical cyclone Winston helped to bridge the historical divide between externally-led emergency responses and nationally-led long-term development programmes. <br />
<br />
Fiji’s lessons learned on emergency response serves as an inspiration for other countries in the region and will be shared with the wider Pacific community, through a Pacific Regional Social Protection and Emergency Response Workshop. WFP has expressed willingness to facilitate such an initiative, also in view of supporting Fiji and other governments in the Pacific community through South-South learning on emergency preparedness and response. <br />
<br />
For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page. <br />

Best match
The vulnerability of rural communities in Guatemala is directly related to the adverse effects of climate change, which affects their nutrition and food security. <br />
<br />
To increase resilience against climate change and productivity of smallholder farmers in Guatemala, the United Nations World Food Program (WFP) helped the Government to strengthen its efforts to develop the production and consumption of crops biofortified with nutrients lacking in the Guatemalan diet. <br />
<br />
This effort was supported through technical assistance from Chile’s Institute for Agricultural Development in partnership with a local NGO called “Semilla Nueva”. <br />
<br />
The goal of this solution was to improve the living conditions in Guatemala’s rural areas of Jalapa and Jutiapa and overcome hunger, malnutrition and poverty through productive promotion of biofortified crops. <br />
<br />
The project targeted the farmers of six WFP-assisted smallholder farmers’ organizations in Jalapa and Jutiapa Departments, with the purpose of linking their production to formal markets.<br />
<br />
As a result, six WFP-supported organizations of smallholder farmers in rural areas of Guatemala have adopted biofortified crops, including for their own consumption. <br />
<br />
For the full overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page. <br />
Scaling up Biofortified Crops in Guatemala through Technical Assistance from Chile

The vulnerability of rural communities in Guatemala is directly related to the adverse effects of climate change, which affects their nutrition and food security. <br />
<br />
To increase resilience against climate change and productivity of smallholder farmers in Guatemala, the United Nations World Food Program (WFP) helped the Government to strengthen its efforts to develop the production and consumption of crops biofortified with nutrients lacking in the Guatemalan diet. <br />
<br />
This effort was supported through technical assistance from Chile’s Institute for Agricultural Development in partnership with a local NGO called “Semilla Nueva”. <br />
<br />
The goal of this solution was to improve the living conditions in Guatemala’s rural areas of Jalapa and Jutiapa and overcome hunger, malnutrition and poverty through productive promotion of biofortified crops. <br />
<br />
The project targeted the farmers of six WFP-assisted smallholder farmers’ organizations in Jalapa and Jutiapa Departments, with the purpose of linking their production to formal markets.<br />
<br />
As a result, six WFP-supported organizations of smallholder farmers in rural areas of Guatemala have adopted biofortified crops, including for their own consumption. <br />
<br />
For the full overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page. <br />

Best match
Kenya’s national home-grown school meals programme contributes to improving child health and nutrition by linking schools and local agricultural production. <br />
<br />
Funds are transferred directly to schools, enabling them to purchase food from local suppliers and farmers. This allows to (1) increase local food production and promote small-scale farmers’ access to markets, while (2) improving school enrollment, attendance and completion. In 2016, the government-led home-grown school meals programme targeted 950,000 children in both arid and semi-arid counties. At the same time, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) continued to provide school meals for 430,000 children in the arid land areas and targeted schools in the informal settlements in Nairobi that are not yet covered by the home-grown school meals programme. To support the expansion of the programme, WFP also prepared schools in Nairobi, Tana River and parts of Turkana to transition to the home-grown model, involving another 152,000 children. <br />
<br />
Kenya’s innovative home-grown school meals programme has long served as an inspiration to other developing countries, particularly “peers” in the region. For example, Namibia and Zambia, with the support from WFP as South-South Cooperation broker, engaged in a cross-regional peer learning initiative in 2016 on home-grown school meals programmes. <br />
<br />
Apart from learning from Kenya’s model, the participating countries also used this opportunity for mutual exchange of experiences on how to monitor and evaluate national school meals programmes. For example Namibia presented its innovative “Namibian School Feeding Programme Information system” technology, which promotes immediate improvements in the management of the national school meals systems. <br />
<br />
Beyond engaging in South-South Cooperation exchanges with peers in the region, Kenya also participated in a South-South study visit to Brazil. This trip informed the preparation of Kenya’s National School Meals and Nutrition Strategy, which will be launched in 2017. <br />
<br />
The innovative features of the Kenya home-grown school meals program include: <br />
1) The current fresh foods pilot in Nairobi county is contributing to the global evidence base on the impact of using different modalities for diversifying school meals. One innovation tested in this pilot is the incorporation in school meals of commercially unacceptable fresh foods, which have been rejected by export markets due to their appearance. Kenya provides nearly 10% of the EU’s horticulture market, exporting over 115,000 metric tonnes of fresh fruit and vegetables annually. Nearly 25% of these fruits and vegetables that are fit for human consumption are rejected for cosmetic reasons, which amounts to over 75 metric tonnes each day. <br />
<br />
2) The separate “Transitional Cash Transfer to Schools” pilot in Kenya’s arid land areas provides new evidence that, with the right support, even schools in areas with limited production and relatively weaker markets can purchase food locally, and empower parents and teachers to manage their own quality school meals programmes. <br />
<br />
For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page. <br />
Kenya Home Grown School Meals Programme

Kenya’s national home-grown school meals programme contributes to improving child health and nutrition by linking schools and local agricultural production. <br />
<br />
Funds are transferred directly to schools, enabling them to purchase food from local suppliers and farmers. This allows to (1) increase local food production and promote small-scale farmers’ access to markets, while (2) improving school enrollment, attendance and completion. In 2016, the government-led home-grown school meals programme targeted 950,000 children in both arid and semi-arid counties. At the same time, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) continued to provide school meals for 430,000 children in the arid land areas and targeted schools in the informal settlements in Nairobi that are not yet covered by the home-grown school meals programme. To support the expansion of the programme, WFP also prepared schools in Nairobi, Tana River and parts of Turkana to transition to the home-grown model, involving another 152,000 children. <br />
<br />
Kenya’s innovative home-grown school meals programme has long served as an inspiration to other developing countries, particularly “peers” in the region. For example, Namibia and Zambia, with the support from WFP as South-South Cooperation broker, engaged in a cross-regional peer learning initiative in 2016 on home-grown school meals programmes. <br />
<br />
Apart from learning from Kenya’s model, the participating countries also used this opportunity for mutual exchange of experiences on how to monitor and evaluate national school meals programmes. For example Namibia presented its innovative “Namibian School Feeding Programme Information system” technology, which promotes immediate improvements in the management of the national school meals systems. <br />
<br />
Beyond engaging in South-South Cooperation exchanges with peers in the region, Kenya also participated in a South-South study visit to Brazil. This trip informed the preparation of Kenya’s National School Meals and Nutrition Strategy, which will be launched in 2017. <br />
<br />
The innovative features of the Kenya home-grown school meals program include: <br />
1) The current fresh foods pilot in Nairobi county is contributing to the global evidence base on the impact of using different modalities for diversifying school meals. One innovation tested in this pilot is the incorporation in school meals of commercially unacceptable fresh foods, which have been rejected by export markets due to their appearance. Kenya provides nearly 10% of the EU’s horticulture market, exporting over 115,000 metric tonnes of fresh fruit and vegetables annually. Nearly 25% of these fruits and vegetables that are fit for human consumption are rejected for cosmetic reasons, which amounts to over 75 metric tonnes each day. <br />
<br />
2) The separate “Transitional Cash Transfer to Schools” pilot in Kenya’s arid land areas provides new evidence that, with the right support, even schools in areas with limited production and relatively weaker markets can purchase food locally, and empower parents and teachers to manage their own quality school meals programmes. <br />
<br />
For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page. <br />

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