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The WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil is a partnership between the United Nations World Food Program (WFP) and the Government of Brazil that started back in 2011, with the support of other partners, such as the UK Department for International Development and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. It enables other developing countries to tap into Brazil’s successful Zero Hunger experiences for learning, sharing and adaptation through South-South and triangular cooperation. In the last five years, forty countries have benefitted directly from the WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil&#039;s activities and its innovative approach on school meals, nutrition, social development and capacity strengthening.<br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> Stakeholders:<br /><br /><br /> Building innovative partnerships between governments, companies and organizations is at the core of the WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil’s strategy to support other countries in their fight against hunger and malnutrition and to help them reach the Sustainable Development Goals. <br /><br /><br /> High-level government officials, international NGOs, international donors, researchers, and school communities (including staff, teachers, cooks, and students) are among the Centre’s stakeholders.<br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> South-South Cooperation:<br /><br /><br /> All technical assistance activities of the WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil start upon request for support of a partner government. The multidimensional approach of the Centre can benefit any country, not only developing countries, who are facing challenges in designing and implementing sustainable school meals or social protection programmes.<br /><br /><br /> The WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil is supported by a vast network of partners. New partnerships (in Asia for example) are crucial to maintain, increase, and improve the activities of the Centre to support developing countries in tackling hunger and malnutrition. In addition, the Centre also conduces many joint initiatives such as research projects and dialogue forums in specific countries. These help to foster the development of innovative solutions to overcome hunger and poverty.<br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page.
World Food Programme Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil

The WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil is a partnership between the United Nations World Food Program (WFP) and the Government of Brazil that started back in 2011, with the support of other partners, such as the UK Department for International Development and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. It enables other developing countries to tap into Brazil’s successful Zero Hunger experiences for learning, sharing and adaptation through South-South and triangular cooperation. In the last five years, forty countries have benefitted directly from the WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil's activities and its innovative approach on school meals, nutrition, social development and capacity strengthening.





Stakeholders:


Building innovative partnerships between governments, companies and organizations is at the core of the WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil’s strategy to support other countries in their fight against hunger and malnutrition and to help them reach the Sustainable Development Goals.


High-level government officials, international NGOs, international donors, researchers, and school communities (including staff, teachers, cooks, and students) are among the Centre’s stakeholders.





South-South Cooperation:


All technical assistance activities of the WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil start upon request for support of a partner government. The multidimensional approach of the Centre can benefit any country, not only developing countries, who are facing challenges in designing and implementing sustainable school meals or social protection programmes.


The WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil is supported by a vast network of partners. New partnerships (in Asia for example) are crucial to maintain, increase, and improve the activities of the Centre to support developing countries in tackling hunger and malnutrition. In addition, the Centre also conduces many joint initiatives such as research projects and dialogue forums in specific countries. These help to foster the development of innovative solutions to overcome hunger and poverty.





For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page.

Best match
The Whales of Guerrero Research Project is a successful and replicable project that collaborates with local communities to promote marine conservation through research, educational outreach and capacity-building activities. <br /><br /><br />
Collaborating with local communities to promote marine conservation in Mexico

The Whales of Guerrero Research Project is a successful and replicable project that collaborates with local communities to promote marine conservation through research, educational outreach and capacity-building activities.


Best match
Social protection and safety nets is WFP’s largest focus area for South-South and triangular exchanges worldwide. <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> The Dominican Republic’s Progresando con Solidaridad programme represents an excellent and innovative example of how to optimize an existing national social protection scheme and make it highly nutrition-sensitive.<br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> While a number of social protection schemes around the world may have a single nutrition component, Progresando con Solidaridad is innovative for the comprehensive range of nutrition components that are embedded in the programme. For example, the programme includes nutrition education; community nutrition networks and distribution of micronutrient powders and specialized nutritious food to children under the age of 5, to pregnant and lactating women and to the elderly.<br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> Its nutrition intervention component was first targeted to all children aged 6-59 months of beneficiary families, who were identified as living in moderate and extreme poverty. After 2013, the nutrition intervention was extended to children under the age of five, pregnant and lactating women and the elderly benefitting from the programme. <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> An evaluation of the nutrition component of the Progresando con Solidaridad programme (2013), highlighted a 50 percent reduction in anaemia prevalence in children enrolled in the programme. Progresando con Solidaridad programme was selected as a successful case study at the Global Forum on Nutrition-Sensitive Social Protection in September 2015. The Forum is a South-South learning platform facilitated by the WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil, which promotes South-South and triangular cooperation and aims to facilitate exchanges of lessons learned on social protection programmes across the developing world. Over 150 participants from 20 countries joined the Forum and learnt from the Dominican Republic’s experience.<br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page. <br /><br /><br />
Leveraging Social Protection platforms for improved nutrition in the Dominican Republic

Social protection and safety nets is WFP’s largest focus area for South-South and triangular exchanges worldwide.





The Dominican Republic’s Progresando con Solidaridad programme represents an excellent and innovative example of how to optimize an existing national social protection scheme and make it highly nutrition-sensitive.





While a number of social protection schemes around the world may have a single nutrition component, Progresando con Solidaridad is innovative for the comprehensive range of nutrition components that are embedded in the programme. For example, the programme includes nutrition education; community nutrition networks and distribution of micronutrient powders and specialized nutritious food to children under the age of 5, to pregnant and lactating women and to the elderly.





Its nutrition intervention component was first targeted to all children aged 6-59 months of beneficiary families, who were identified as living in moderate and extreme poverty. After 2013, the nutrition intervention was extended to children under the age of five, pregnant and lactating women and the elderly benefitting from the programme.





An evaluation of the nutrition component of the Progresando con Solidaridad programme (2013), highlighted a 50 percent reduction in anaemia prevalence in children enrolled in the programme. Progresando con Solidaridad programme was selected as a successful case study at the Global Forum on Nutrition-Sensitive Social Protection in September 2015. The Forum is a South-South learning platform facilitated by the WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil, which promotes South-South and triangular cooperation and aims to facilitate exchanges of lessons learned on social protection programmes across the developing world. Over 150 participants from 20 countries joined the Forum and learnt from the Dominican Republic’s experience.





For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page.


Best match
The vulnerability of rural communities in Guatemala is directly related to the adverse effects of climate change, which affects their nutrition and food security. <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> To increase resilience against climate change and productivity of smallholder farmers in Guatemala, the United Nations World Food Program (WFP) helped the Government to strengthen its efforts to develop the production and consumption of crops biofortified with nutrients lacking in the Guatemalan diet. <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> This effort was supported through technical assistance from Chile’s Institute for Agricultural Development in partnership with a local NGO called “Semilla Nueva”. <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> The goal of this solution was to improve the living conditions in Guatemala’s rural areas of Jalapa and Jutiapa and overcome hunger, malnutrition and poverty through productive promotion of biofortified crops. <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> The project targeted the farmers of six WFP-assisted smallholder farmers’ organizations in Jalapa and Jutiapa Departments, with the purpose of linking their production to formal markets.<br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> As a result, six WFP-supported organizations of smallholder farmers in rural areas of Guatemala have adopted biofortified crops, including for their own consumption. <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> For the full overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page. <br /><br /><br />
Scaling up Biofortified Crops in Guatemala through Technical Assistance from Chile

The vulnerability of rural communities in Guatemala is directly related to the adverse effects of climate change, which affects their nutrition and food security.





To increase resilience against climate change and productivity of smallholder farmers in Guatemala, the United Nations World Food Program (WFP) helped the Government to strengthen its efforts to develop the production and consumption of crops biofortified with nutrients lacking in the Guatemalan diet.





This effort was supported through technical assistance from Chile’s Institute for Agricultural Development in partnership with a local NGO called “Semilla Nueva”.





The goal of this solution was to improve the living conditions in Guatemala’s rural areas of Jalapa and Jutiapa and overcome hunger, malnutrition and poverty through productive promotion of biofortified crops.





The project targeted the farmers of six WFP-assisted smallholder farmers’ organizations in Jalapa and Jutiapa Departments, with the purpose of linking their production to formal markets.





As a result, six WFP-supported organizations of smallholder farmers in rural areas of Guatemala have adopted biofortified crops, including for their own consumption.





For the full overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page.


Best match
Kenya’s national home-grown school meals programme contributes to improving child health and nutrition by linking schools and local agricultural production. <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> Funds are transferred directly to schools, enabling them to purchase food from local suppliers and farmers. This allows to (1) increase local food production and promote small-scale farmers’ access to markets, while (2) improving school enrollment, attendance and completion. In 2016, the government-led home-grown school meals programme targeted 950,000 children in both arid and semi-arid counties. At the same time, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) continued to provide school meals for 430,000 children in the arid land areas and targeted schools in the informal settlements in Nairobi that are not yet covered by the home-grown school meals programme. To support the expansion of the programme, WFP also prepared schools in Nairobi, Tana River and parts of Turkana to transition to the home-grown model, involving another 152,000 children. <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> Kenya’s innovative home-grown school meals programme has long served as an inspiration to other developing countries, particularly “peers” in the region. For example, Namibia and Zambia, with the support from WFP as South-South Cooperation broker, engaged in a cross-regional peer learning initiative in 2016 on home-grown school meals programmes. <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> Apart from learning from Kenya’s model, the participating countries also used this opportunity for a mutual exchange of experiences on how to monitor and evaluate national school meals programmes. For example Namibia presented its innovative “Namibian School Feeding Programme Information system” technology, which promotes immediate improvements in the management of the national school meals systems. <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> Beyond engaging in South-South Cooperation exchanges with peers in the region, Kenya also participated in a South-South study visit to Brazil. This trip informed the preparation of Kenya’s National School Meals and Nutrition Strategy, which will be launched in 2017. <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> The innovative features of the Kenya home-grown school meals program include: <br /><br /><br /> 1) The current fresh foods pilot in Nairobi county is contributing to the global evidence base on the impact of using different modalities for diversifying school meals. One innovation tested in this pilot is the incorporation in school meals of commercially unacceptable fresh foods, which have been rejected by export markets due to their appearance. Kenya provides nearly 10% of the EU’s horticulture market, exporting over 115,000 metric tonnes of fresh fruit and vegetables annually. Nearly 25% of these fruits and vegetables that are fit for human consumption are rejected for cosmetic reasons, which amounts to over 75 metric tonnes each day. <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> 2) The separate “Transitional Cash Transfer to Schools” pilot in Kenya’s arid land areas provides new evidence that, with the right support, even schools in areas with limited production and relatively weaker markets can purchase food locally, and empower parents and teachers to manage their own quality school meals programmes. <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page. <br /><br /><br />
Kenya Home Grown School Meals Programme

Kenya’s national home-grown school meals programme contributes to improving child health and nutrition by linking schools and local agricultural production.





Funds are transferred directly to schools, enabling them to purchase food from local suppliers and farmers. This allows to (1) increase local food production and promote small-scale farmers’ access to markets, while (2) improving school enrollment, attendance and completion. In 2016, the government-led home-grown school meals programme targeted 950,000 children in both arid and semi-arid counties. At the same time, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) continued to provide school meals for 430,000 children in the arid land areas and targeted schools in the informal settlements in Nairobi that are not yet covered by the home-grown school meals programme. To support the expansion of the programme, WFP also prepared schools in Nairobi, Tana River and parts of Turkana to transition to the home-grown model, involving another 152,000 children.





Kenya’s innovative home-grown school meals programme has long served as an inspiration to other developing countries, particularly “peers” in the region. For example, Namibia and Zambia, with the support from WFP as South-South Cooperation broker, engaged in a cross-regional peer learning initiative in 2016 on home-grown school meals programmes.





Apart from learning from Kenya’s model, the participating countries also used this opportunity for a mutual exchange of experiences on how to monitor and evaluate national school meals programmes. For example Namibia presented its innovative “Namibian School Feeding Programme Information system” technology, which promotes immediate improvements in the management of the national school meals systems.





Beyond engaging in South-South Cooperation exchanges with peers in the region, Kenya also participated in a South-South study visit to Brazil. This trip informed the preparation of Kenya’s National School Meals and Nutrition Strategy, which will be launched in 2017.





The innovative features of the Kenya home-grown school meals program include:


1) The current fresh foods pilot in Nairobi county is contributing to the global evidence base on the impact of using different modalities for diversifying school meals. One innovation tested in this pilot is the incorporation in school meals of commercially unacceptable fresh foods, which have been rejected by export markets due to their appearance. Kenya provides nearly 10% of the EU’s horticulture market, exporting over 115,000 metric tonnes of fresh fruit and vegetables annually. Nearly 25% of these fruits and vegetables that are fit for human consumption are rejected for cosmetic reasons, which amounts to over 75 metric tonnes each day.





2) The separate “Transitional Cash Transfer to Schools” pilot in Kenya’s arid land areas provides new evidence that, with the right support, even schools in areas with limited production and relatively weaker markets can purchase food locally, and empower parents and teachers to manage their own quality school meals programmes.





For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page.


Best match
Family farming in Colombia would benefit from more dynamic mechanisms to access markets because of a long chain of intermediaries that reduces the profit of smallholder producers. <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> This problem is widely-shared among many other developing countries, but some have found effective solutions to address this challenge. It is the case of Brazil for example, which has developed very relevant experience in connecting smallholder farmers to markets through over fifteen years of the implementation of the Brazilian national school meals programme. The Government of Brazil, with support from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the United Nations World Food Program (WFP), has developed a South-South Cooperation programme to promote its innovative approach to allow for an increase in income and business capabilities of smallholder families in other developing countries, by linking them to providers of public food based social programs.<br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> One of the countries supported by this programme is Colombia, through the Colombia-Brazil South-South Cooperation program (July 2014-April 2016). Beneficiaries of the programme were Colombian smallholder agricultural producer families, with incomes of less than USD 200 per month. The programme targeted twelve organizations of smallholder farmers and three hundred families from the Colombian municipalities of Grenada, Carmen de Viboral and Cáceres in the Antioquia region; and of Córdoba and Samaniego in the Nariño Region . The program supported ethnic communities and victims of violence in the zones affected by armed conflict, prioritizing women’s participation. The Brazilian methodology was shared through workshops that were developed locally between smallholder farmers and central and local government officials.<br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> The project was a joint collaboration between the Government of Brazil, WFP and FAO, with the support and collaboration of the Presidential Agency for International Cooperation of Colombia. The Brazilian Government, in addition to contributing with its experience in institutional procurement models, financed this project in Colombia. The Government of Colombia involved the Ministries of Foreign Affairs, Health, Education and Agriculture along with the Colombian Institute of Family Welfare, amongst others. These institutions provided technical support and follow-up to the initiatives generated locally. FAO provided technical support to participants and their families in the application of good agricultural practices in crops, carried out trainings in associativity and business methods for this sector. WFP developed procurement models for the producers involved in the project as well as provided marketing trainings and support in developing business agreements.<br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> Ultimately, the joint Colombia-Brazil South-South Cooperation program achieved the commercial linkage of 1000 small holder producers to local markets.<br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page. <br /><br /><br />
Promoting Access to Markets for Smallholder Farmers in Colombia

Family farming in Colombia would benefit from more dynamic mechanisms to access markets because of a long chain of intermediaries that reduces the profit of smallholder producers.





This problem is widely-shared among many other developing countries, but some have found effective solutions to address this challenge. It is the case of Brazil for example, which has developed very relevant experience in connecting smallholder farmers to markets through over fifteen years of the implementation of the Brazilian national school meals programme. The Government of Brazil, with support from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the United Nations World Food Program (WFP), has developed a South-South Cooperation programme to promote its innovative approach to allow for an increase in income and business capabilities of smallholder families in other developing countries, by linking them to providers of public food based social programs.





One of the countries supported by this programme is Colombia, through the Colombia-Brazil South-South Cooperation program (July 2014-April 2016). Beneficiaries of the programme were Colombian smallholder agricultural producer families, with incomes of less than USD 200 per month. The programme targeted twelve organizations of smallholder farmers and three hundred families from the Colombian municipalities of Grenada, Carmen de Viboral and Cáceres in the Antioquia region; and of Córdoba and Samaniego in the Nariño Region . The program supported ethnic communities and victims of violence in the zones affected by armed conflict, prioritizing women’s participation. The Brazilian methodology was shared through workshops that were developed locally between smallholder farmers and central and local government officials.





The project was a joint collaboration between the Government of Brazil, WFP and FAO, with the support and collaboration of the Presidential Agency for International Cooperation of Colombia. The Brazilian Government, in addition to contributing with its experience in institutional procurement models, financed this project in Colombia. The Government of Colombia involved the Ministries of Foreign Affairs, Health, Education and Agriculture along with the Colombian Institute of Family Welfare, amongst others. These institutions provided technical support and follow-up to the initiatives generated locally. FAO provided technical support to participants and their families in the application of good agricultural practices in crops, carried out trainings in associativity and business methods for this sector. WFP developed procurement models for the producers involved in the project as well as provided marketing trainings and support in developing business agreements.





Ultimately, the joint Colombia-Brazil South-South Cooperation program achieved the commercial linkage of 1000 small holder producers to local markets.





For the complete overview of this solution, please click on the PDF-file at the bottom of the page.


Best match
Living, global library of solutions for the SDGs shared by social entrepreneurs and the funders who support them.
The Resilience Exchange

Living, global library of solutions for the SDGs shared by social entrepreneurs and the funders who support them.

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In order to address climate change, the UN Secretariat (EOSG) and UNDP China jointly spearheaded an initiative that identifies innovative approaches to climate change adaptation and mitigation through the establishment of a platform for the Alliance of Climate-Friendly Communities through South-South cooperation. The main purpose of the Southern Alliance of Climate Friendly Communities is to bring together potential south-south cooperation partners such that they can share and learn good development practice approaches.
A Platform for the Alliance of Climate-Friendly Communities through South-South Cooperation

In order to address climate change, the UN Secretariat (EOSG) and UNDP China jointly spearheaded an initiative that identifies innovative approaches to climate change adaptation and mitigation through the establishment of a platform for the Alliance of Climate-Friendly Communities through South-South cooperation. The main purpose of the Southern Alliance of Climate Friendly Communities is to bring together potential south-south cooperation partners such that they can share and learn good development practice approaches.

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Guatemala has improved governance for food security and child nutrition within the framework of the Guatemala Zero Hunger Plan through the exchange and adaptation of experiences from Chile.
Strengthening Governance for Nutrition

Guatemala has improved governance for food security and child nutrition within the framework of the Guatemala Zero Hunger Plan through the exchange and adaptation of experiences from Chile.

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